Chapter XXVIII

The Johns of Ferrans 1866 - 1965

 

28.1.1 John North-Bomford 1838 - 1905

28.1.2 Lease of Ferrans and Gallow 19th March 1863

28.1.3 Mortgage of Ferrans and Gallow 7th February 1866

28.2.1 Marriage Settlement of John North-Bomford and Charlotte Maria Devenish-Meares 23rd July 1867

28.2.2 The Devenish-Meares and Kelly Families

28.3 Mortgages 3rd November 1868

28.3.1 £200 Loan Repaid 3rd November 1868

28.3.2 £3,750 Mortgage on Gallow and Ferrans 3rd November 1868

28.4 John’s Second Marriage

28.4.1 Marriage Settlement, John North-Bomford and Mary Wilhelmina Constance Kaye 4th September 1882

28.4.2 The Kaye Family

28.4.3 The Barker Family

28.4.4 After the Marriage

28.5 Mary Wilhelmina Marries Again 16th December 1908

28.6 John George North-Bomford 1883 - 1965

28.6.1 Ferrans House Burnt during ‘The Troubles’ 1923

28.7 David John North-Bomford 1912 - 1949

28.8 Summary of John North-Bomford and his Family

 

28.1.1 John North-Bomford 1838 - 1905

John was born on 17th July 1838, the second son, though probably the fourth child, of Isaac and Belinda Emily North-Bomford (Pilkington) (27.2.1). It is not known where he was educated, but on 29 February 1856, when he was 18, he became an ensign in the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot. His regiment sailed to India late in 1856 and John went with them since Burke states that he served in Burma and Bengal. 1857 was the year of the Indian Mutiny and the regiment must have been involved with it; however they were sent firstly to Burma, which was then part of India and where the mutiny was not so severe as elsewhere in India, and later to Bengal. John was gazetted a Lieutenant in the 29th Foot on 23 July 1858 'without purchase' (Bulletins and Other State Intelligence, p 2737, Google Books) and a Captain in 1862. It is not known when the regiment left India but in 1863 John was stationed at Glasgow and in 1866 at Chatham. In 1867 the regiment was in Malta and in 1868 John was excluded from the Army List.

Back at home his elder brother Isaac (27.5), who had been serving in China in the 1850s, died in 1862 and this meant that John would inherit Ferrans and Gallow; in October 1866 his father died and he came into the place. It is therefore likely that he did not go to Malta with the regiment but resigned his commission in 1866 on, or just before, the death of his father. All the deeds of 1867 and later place him at home at Ferrans.

Meanwhile John had to arrange his financial affairs and it rather looks as though the latter part of his army life was more expensive than he had hoped. He firstly arranged an income from the land of £100 a year and then in 1866 he had to borrow a further £200 from his father.

28.1.2 Lease of Ferrans and Gallow 19th March 1863

Between

1. Isaac North-Bomford of Ferrans (father).

2. John North-Bomford, Captain in Her Majesty’s 29th Regiment of Infantry at present stationed at Glasgow. (Heir to Isaac).

3. Henry Macnamara Morgan of Kingstown, Co Dublin, and James Blaquiere of 19 Middle Gardiner Street, Dublin.

4. John Emerson of Gallow (brother-in-law) and Richard Charles MacNevin of Middle Gardiner Street, Dublin

5. Elliott Elmes Whitney of Woodlands, Co Wexford, and Benjamin Whitney of Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin, solicitor, (brother-in-law).

In order “to defeat and destroy all estates tail of the said John North-Bomford”, John North-Bomford and Isaac North-Bomford who was ‘Protector’ of the settlement of the will of Isaac Bomford dated 19th December 1835 (23.4.1), leased to Party 3 the fee farm lands of:

on payment of £100 per annum to John North-Bomford

(1863 Book 10 No 89)

James Blaquiere is a descendant of Colonel John Blaquiere who came to Ireland as the Chief Secretary to the Viceroy, Lord Harcourt, in 1772; Colonel John built Deerfield in Phoenix Park four years later, and his house became the residence of future Chief Secretaries. Indeed in 1898 it became the house of John North-Bomford’s future father-in-law, Sir William Kaye (28.4.2). Since 1927 the house became the residence of the American Ambassador to Ireland.

28.1.3 Mortgage of Ferrans and Gallow 7th February 1866

John North-Bomford, Captain of Her Majesty’s 29th Regiment of Infantry, then stationed at Chatham, England, borrowed £200 from his father, Isaac North-Bomford of Ferrans. The £200 were on lands which were entailed, so the entail had to be removed. This was done by leasing the land with the approval of all concerned to John North of Leeson Street, Dublin; and David North of Fairview, Co Westmeath, Medical Doctor. (1866 Book 5 No 75)

In other words the two North brothers, John and David, the nephews of Isaac North-Bomford, gave a mortgage on the land for £200. This loan was repaid in 1868 after John had left the army (28.3.1).

28.2.1 Marriage Settlement of John North-Bomford and Charlotte Maria Devenish-Meares 23rd July 1867

Between

1. John North-Bomford of Gallow, late a Captain in Her Majesty’s 29th Regiment of Infantry

2. John Devenish-Meares of Mearescourt, Co Westmeath, DL, JP

3. Charlotte Meares, eldest daughter of John Devenish-Meares

4. William Lewis Devenish-Meares, Major in Her Majesty’s 20th Regiment of Infantry, and Horatio North-Bomford of Landsdowne Road, Dublin.

5. Robert Hume Kelly of Glencarra, Co Westmeath.

Reciting that

A marriage is about to be solemnised between John North-Bomford and Charlotte Meares (it was the next day, 24th July 1867).

Now John Devenish-Meares settles £2,000 from his marriage settlement onto Charlotte Meares. This sum is given to the trustee Robert Hume Kelly. (£2,000 is recorded in the registry No 171, but in No 172 it is £3,000).

Now John North-Bomford leases to the trustees in Party 4 the lands of Gallow, now known as the House Division, Gallow, now known as Little Gallow, and Ferrans or Ferns with the subdivision of Brayfield, to raise the sum of £3,000 for the children of the marriage and to cover the payment of £300 a year to Charlotte Meares on the death of John North-Bomford. (1867 Vol 23 a combination of Numbers 171 and 172)

So John married Charlotte on 24th July 1867 (ex Burke); no marriage licence has been found. It is not known where they lived initially, probably in the recently restored Ferrans, but this is not certain as the land had been leased to John’s brother, Horatio (27.9.1), and this lease was not terminated until 1886. According to the Dublin Directory they had a town house from 1871 to 1876, number 88 Pembroke Road near Ballsbridge, with a valuation of £66. Later on they certainly lived at Ferrans.

In 1872 John was commissioned as a Magistrate of Meath and remained one until he died. On 7th March 1885 he was sworn in as a member of the Grand Jury of Meath (Meath Herald).

28.2.2 The Devenish-Meares and Kelly Families

Charlotte was the eldest daughter of John Devenish-Meares, DL, JP, of Mearescourt (sometimes spelt Mearscourt), ten miles west of Mullingar; he was married on 6th July 1831 and died in July 1876; Charlotte’s mother was Maria, the 5th daughter of Charles Kelly of Charleville, five miles south of Mearscourt, and later of Glencara, halfway between Mearscourt and Charleville.

Robert Hume Kelly, 1800 - 1868, JP, Party 5 of the deed, was Charlotte’s uncle, the third son who inherited Glencara and the father of the first of the Harvey-Kelly’s. Glencara was built in 1824, probably by Charlotte’s grandfather, Charles Kelly; it was sold about 1938 by Major Francis Vandeleur Hume Harvey-Kelly (1877 - 1950), grandnephew of Charlotte.

Charlotte had at least two brothers, Major-General William Lewis (Party 4 when still a major) and Joseph Leycester Devenish-Meares. The General was born in 1832 and in 1870 he married Katherine Charlotte (Folliott) of Vicar’s Cross, Chester; he inherited Mearscourt, but had no children and the place went to his younger brother, Joseph Leycester. Joseph was born in 1838, graduated MA from Trinity College and in 1864 married Frances Georgina, a daughter of Basil George Brooke, JP; their son, John Frederick Devenish-Meares, born 1866, BA Trinity, came into Mearscourt eventually. Mearscourt was a 3 storey, 5 bay front, house built in the early 1700s and improved in the late 1700s.

Charlotte had many Kelly, Harvey-Kelly and Devenish-Meares nephews and nieces.

28.3 Mortgages 3rd November 1868

On this date John cleared the land of debts by paying £2,150 (27.8.4) to his brother David George, and £200 to the two North brothers (deed below). This left him free to take out a much larger mortgage of £3,750 which was done on the same day and which no doubt was used to pay these debts. If this supposition is true then he was left with a balance of £1,400, and taking the supposition a stage further, this balance was paid to his sister Belinda Emily; at any rate £1,400 was mentioned in her marriage settlement (27.10.1). It is difficult to state what exactly happened but no doubt John had to make payments to his brothers and sisters in the terms of his father’s will. One reason for supposing that these payments were according to Isaac’s will is that in all cases Benjamin Whitney is involved and he was the executor of Isaac’s will. It was a common practice to make a marriage settlement stating a figure to be paid to the children on the death of the father; this necessarily was a gamble since it was not known at that stage how many children there would be, and many estates had to be sold to pay these legacies, whilst many more were placed heavily in debt, a debt which the young heir might take years to repay.

28.3.1 £200 Loan Repaid 3rd November 1868

Between

1. John North of Leeson Street, Dublin, and David North of Fairview, Co Westmeath.

2. Benjamin Whitney of Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin, solicitor, executor of the will of Isaac North-Bomford late of Ferrans deceased.

3. John North-Bomford of Ferrans.

For £200 paid to Benjamin Whitney by John North-Bomford so the lands of Ferrans and Gallow were freed of encumbrances by John North and David North. (1868 Vol 34 No 74) (28.1.3 refers)

28.3.2 £3,750 Mortgage on Gallow and Ferrans 3rd November 1868

Between

1. Elliott Elmes Whitney of Woodlands, Co Wexford, and Benjamin Whitney of Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin.

2. Benjamin Whitney, sole executor of the will of Isaac North-Bomford late of Ferrans, deceased (27.6.2)

3. John North-Bomford of Ferrans

4. John Wakely of Ballyburley, (near Edenderry) King’s County (born 1820, High Sheriff).

5. William Fleming Black of Lislap, Co Tyrone (Barrister in Dublin, born 1818, grandfather of William Fleming Black of Strabane).

In consideration of the sum of £3,750 paid by John Wakely to Elliott Elmes Whitney and Benjamin Whitney under the direction of John North-Bomford, and with the consent of Benjamin Whitney as executor of Isaac North-Bomford, the lands of Ferrans and Gallow are transferred into the hands of John Wakely. (1868 Vol 34 No 75)

28.4 John’s Second Marriage

In October 1881 Charlotte Maria died, aged about 46. She had no children. A year later John, then aged 44, married again.

28.4.1 Marriage Settlement, John North-Bomford and Mary Wilhelmina Constance Kaye 4th September 1882

Between

1. John North-Bomford of Gallow, late a Captain in Her Majesty’s 29th Regiment of Infantry

2. William Squire Barker Kaye, QC, LLD, of 16 Gardiner’s Place, Dublin

3. Mary Wilhelmina Constance Kaye, eldest daughter of William S.B. Kaye

4. William Oliver Barker, MD, of No 6 Gardiner’s Row, Dublin; and Horatio North-Bomford of Lara, Co Meath (the trustees).

Reciting that

A marriage is about to be solemnised (the next day, 5th September 1882) between John North-Bomford and Mary Wilhelmina Constance Kaye.

Now John North-Bomford has conveyed to the trustees (Party 4) the lands of Gallow known as the House Division, and Little Gallow, and also Ferrans including Brayfield, as a jointure of £300.

Now William S. B. Kaye promises to pay to the trustees £50 a year for as long as he lives.

Witnessed: Benjamin Whitney of 36 Dawson Street (brother-in-law). (1882 Vol 32 No 269)

John North Bomford of Ferrans, Co Meath, married on 5 September 1882 Mary Wilhelmina Constance Kaye, daughter of Willliam S B Kaye QC, witness Elizabeth Kaye (St George COI parish records, Dublin).

More information on Mary Kaye's family follows and is attached.

28.4.2 The Kaye Family

Mary Kaye’s grandparents were George Kaye of Markethill, Co Armagh, and Deborah, eldest daughter of Rev William Barker, Rector of Newtown Hamilton. Their youngest son was Mary’s father Sir William Squire Barker Kaye, born 1831, educated Trinity College, BA 1852, and was called to the Bar in 1855. He went on the North-East Circuit, becoming Senior Crown Prosecutor for Co Armagh, and council to the Post Office for the North-East Circuit. In 1865 he was made a Doctor of Law (LLD, TCD) and from 1868 he was one of the Revising Barristers for the City of Dublin. In 1875 he resigned in order to stand for Parliament for Armagh but was not elected. In 1877 he became a QC, a member of the Queen’s Council and a JP. For some time he was one of the editors of the Irish Common Law Reports.

In 1878 he was appointed to be Assistant Under-Secretary for Ireland by the Duke of Marlborough and in 1885 the Lord Lieutenant, Earl Spencer, knighted him in acknowledgement of official services. He became a Companion of the Order of the Bath in 1887. In 1896 he was appointed Private Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant.

In 1859 William married Fanny, the youngest daughter of Richard Barker (see below) of Stirling, Co Meath. They had a number of children and Mary was their eldest daughter so was probably born about 1861. Initially the family lived at 16 Gardiners Place, and then in 1886 they moved to 62 Fitzwilliam Square where they remained until 1895 when they moved to the Private Secretary’s Lodge in Phoenix Park, now the United States Embassy. Soon after their marriage they inherited Abbey House in Armagh and they also lived there off and on.

Mary’s father, Sir William, died on 15th June 1901.

28.4.3 The Barker Family

Mary had at least two Barker uncles and two Barker aunts. Her grandfather was Richard Barker of Stirling, Clonee, Co Meath, who died before 1836, and who married Mary, daughter of Francis McFarlane of Huntstown, Co Dublin (Mary’s grandmother). Their second son (Mary’s uncle and a trustee) was Doctor William Oliver Barker of Stirling and Croboy, Co Meath, born 1818 and educated at Trinity (MB 1841, MD 1844); the eldest son died in 1880 and left his property of Stirling and Croboy to his brother, the doctor; there were other daughters apart from Fanny the youngest, Mary’s mother.

Stirling at Clonee has already figured in the deeds; that of November 1790 (8.6.4) recited a lease to William Coates dated March 1776 by Edward Stirling of land at Clonee. Before that, in June 1750, William Coates married Mary Bomford, 3rd daughter of Stephen of Gallow (8.6), and they lived at Clonee for a while after their marriage, most probably at Stirling. It is not known how the land of Stirling changed ownership from Edward Stirling whose family obviously named the place to the Barker family, but it had taken place by 1836; it might be connected with the marriage of Samuel Coates, Mary Bomford’s brother-in-law, and Lydia Barker in 1750 (8.6.5).

28.4.4 After the Marriage

If Mary Kaye were born in 1861 she would have been about 21 when she married on 5th September 1882; her husband, John North-Bomford, was 23 years older than her. On 13th October 1883 their only child, John George, was born (28.6).

In spite of the depressed state of agriculture in the last quarter of the 1800s, John continued to improve his estates, and in May 1890 he received a grant of £800 from the Commissioners of Public Works for works to be carried out on Gallow, Ferrans, Moatown to the east of the road through Gallow, Brayfield which was part of Ferrans also perhaps east of the road, and one other place which is illegible in the deed (1890, Vol 25, No 68) but must have been another subdivision of Gallow or Ferrans. He was able to continue farming and the estates remained intact; so different to many of his neighbours who had to sell parcels of land to make ends meet. Actually there was very little difference in the acreage of Ferrans and Gallow between 1854 and 1943. In 1878 the “Landowners of Ireland” credits John with 871 acres in Co Meath with a rateable value of £921, much the same as in 1854 and 1906.

On 22 Feb 1883, someone wrote a letter to Colonel Caulfield (sic: see 20.6.1) requesting him to recommend Captain Bomford of Ferrans, County Meath, to Lord Headfort for promotion to Deputy Lieutenant of Meath (http://www.nli.ie/pdfs/mss lists/179_HeadfortPapers(Additional).pdf, page 171, MS 49,032 /11 in the National Library of Ireland).

Although they lived at Ferrans, the Dublin Directory of 1889 does place ‘Captain Bomford’ at No 10 Appian Way in Ranelagh; the next year his younger brother Horatio occupied it.

John North-Bomford died on 16th October 1905, aged 67. He, like so many of his branch of the family, was probably buried in Gallow Churchyard. The National Archives have an index entry for his probate record: John North Bomford, late of Ferrans, Kilcock, Co Meath, JP, retired Captain HM Army, d 16 October 1905, probate granted to Mary WCN Bomford, the widow, effects £18,955, resworn at £19,241.10.5

28.5 Mary Wilhelmina Marries Again 16th December 1908

John’s second wife, Mary Wilhelmina, was only 44 when he died, and on 16th December 1908 she married again. Her second husband was Lieutenant-Colonel Phineas Barrett Villiers-Tuthill, a surgeon in the RAMC.

The Tuthill family originated in Devonshire and came to Ireland in the late 1600s, settling in Co Limerick. John Tuthill, Phineas’ great-grandfather inherited Villiers land in 1794 and became John Villiers-Tuthill of Kilmore, Ballyliney and Doorless, all in Co Limerick, and of Rapla, Co Tipperary. Phineas was the youngest son of John Tuthill the younger (1793 - 1876) by his second wife Margaret, eldest daughter of Doctor Robert Lloyd. It is not known when either Phineas or Mary Wilhelmina died but they had no children. See Miscellanea Genealogica Et Heraldica: Fourth Series edited by W. Bruce Bannerman page 269 (Google Books) for more information.

28.6 John George North-Bomford 1883 - 1965

John George, the only child of John North-Bomford, was born on 13th October 1883 (St George COI parish record, Dublin) and educated at Charterhouse. He inherited Ferrans and Gallow not on his father’s death in 1905 but when his mother re-married in December 1908; actually the ‘Untenanted Lands Return’ in the Valuation Office in Dublin indicates that his mother, and one assumes her second husband, occupied both Ferrans and Gallow until 1912, and only then did John George come into the place, however this is very unlikely. In 1912 Ferrans consisted of 379 acres and Gallow of 465 acres of which 341 acres were leased for about £850 a year; the remaining 124 acres of Gallow and all of Ferrans were farmed by John George, called ‘JG’ by the family, until sometime during the 1920s when the various tenants, mainly the Maher family (see 1854 Valuation, 27.3), handed their leases back and JG farmed both townlands amounting to 844 acres.

In 1943 JG sold Gallow but continued farming Ferrans. Gallow had been in Bomford hands since 1709, 234 years; it passed through six generations:

1. Thomas of Rahinstown (c1651 - l740) and his brother Stephen of Gallow (c1663 - 1759), then

2. John the clergyman (1727 - 1776) and his brother David of Gallow (1730-c1809), then

3. Isaac the attorney (1766 - 1837), followed by his son-in-law

4. Isaac North who became North-Bomford (c1798 - 1866), and his son

5. John of Ferrans (1838 - 1905) and finally his son

6. John George ‘JG’ of Ferrans who sold Gallow in 1943.

On 5th October 1909 John George North-Bomford married Hilda Frances Munn, the youngest daughter of Rev George Shaw Munn, Rector of Madresfield near Malvern in Worcestershire. In 1912 they had a son, David John, their only child. The family considered Hilda a difficult woman who was free with advice, which was often hurtful, and later she dictated to “poor JG” and anyone else about; consequently she was avoided.

On the outbreak of World War I JG joined the army and served with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers; he was a member of the first landing at Gallipoli in 1915 where, after nine months of fighting, the British troops hardly got further than the beaches and had to be withdrawn; he left the army at the end of the war as a major. In 1940 at the beginning of the Second World War he rejoined the forces but being 57 the army refused his services, however he was able to get into the RAF.

28.6.1 Ferrans House Burnt during ‘The Troubles’ 1923

After the treaty of 1921 by which the Irish Free State was set up with the status of a British Dominion, fighting broke out between the republican extremists and the new Irish Government. In 1923 Ferrans was a casualty of this civil war between two Irish parties as is shown by the following contemporary account which comes from a letter of Lady Beatrice, the wife of Lord Dunsany from Dunsany Castle, included in Mark Amory’s book, “Lord Dunsany: A Biography”.

“…On April 16th (1923) they burnt Ferrans, - Major N-B escaped in pyjamas - she dressed, but they (the IRA) poured petrol on her bed before she was dressed, - little David was so busy saving his new puppy that he did not feel the shock. They had sent away two vanloads of their best stuff before luckily, as they saved nothing but the horses. … And though the country people don’t openly approve still all sense of right and wrong is shaken and they do really feel that Mrs N-B’s unpopularity, she was an indiscreet talker, are quite good reasons for the outrage.”

A fuller description of ‘The Troubles’ is written in paragraph 36.1, but to my mind the intriguing part of this letter, apart from the horror and beastliness of the whole affair, is that the local people did not side with the IRA but thought that the burning was justified because of Hilda’s attitude.

The house was rebuilt, largely as before, and of course re-furnished. As a child in the 1930s I visited Ferrans but only remember that it was rather dark inside and spooky; after the war the family seldom visited the place because Hilda was such ‘an indiscreet talker’; however JG was liked by all and he often came to Oakley Park and later here to Crodara.

In 1949 their son David (28.7) died leaving no heir. At one time there was talk of leaving the place to various relatives including my uncles, George and John, but none of them came up to Hilda’s expectations and that ended those ideas.

On 31st January 1960 Hilda died at Ferrans in her early seventies. JG was then aged 77 but the next year at Agher Church on 4th February 1961 he married again. His second wife was Elizabeth (Betty) Susan Armstrong, daughter of George Armstrong and his wife Mary Ackeron. Betty was good for JG and even at his age he was again to be seen at the races, which he loved, and at parties.

On 11th October 1965 JG died in Navan Hospital aged 82 and was buried in Kilcock Churchyard. Betty built herself a smaller house nearly opposite the Ferrans gate-lodge and sold Ferrans in 1966 or 1967. She died in 1980. So ended Ferrans as a Bomford property and that branch of the family; Ferrans was in Bomford hands for 295 years, the longest period of all the various Bomford lands.

Ferrans House was again burnt down in 1972, but this time accidentally, and rebuilt for institutional use, but now I understand it is a stud farm owned by racehorse-breeding Arabs, as is Gallow.

28.7 David John North-Bomford 1912 - 1949

David was born in 1912. As a young man he was tall with fair hair, but was thought to be rather conceited and pugnacious by his contemporaries. He joined the R.A.F. at the beginning of the WWII and became a fighter sergeant pilot, flying Hurricanes with No 17 Squadron. During the battle of Britain on the 18th of August 1940, his Hurricane was damaged in combat with Messerschmitt 109s off Dover at 13:50 hrs.

On 6th January 1946 he married Molly Moore, the only daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick Thornton Trevor Moore, 4th Bengal Lancers, of Crosby House, Derry, and later of Lyle Cottage in Richmond, Yorkshire. David died on 28th April 1949, aged 37, apparently at Killarney, Co Kerry (death index record at https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FTPW-KY8 - recorded as Bamford). He was found on his doorstep, shot through the mouth, with his gun beside him. He was buried on May 2, possibly at Kilcock Churchyard where his father was buried subsequently (28.6.1), but that has not been confirmed (a compendium of Kilcock graveyard inscriptions (item 13) exists but was not on-line as at Jan 2016). There were no children.

Molly married four times: first to Captain Cloudesley Shovell Malcolm Brereton, Royal Norfolk Regiment, of Briningham House in Norfolk who was killed in action during the Second World War; second to David North-Bomford; third on 4th March 1959 to Hugh Keene, who was made a Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (CIE) for his work with the Indian Police and died in September 1966; fourth, as his second wife, to Colonel Richard Crawford Langford, RAMC, on 9th November 1968. Colonel Langford was born 28th May 1907, the only son of Major Charles Langford, DSO (1901), who commanded the Royal Irish Hussars, of The Abbey in Rathkeale, Co Limerick. Colonel Richard Langford was in the RAMC during World War II and retired in 1955 to Tidworth in Hampshire.

28.8 Summary of John North-Bomford and his Family

John North-Bomford (Isaac’s 2nd son 27.2.1), born 17th July 1838, Capt 29th Regt of Foot, served 1857 in Burma and Bengal, 1866 inherited Ferrans and Gallow, 1872 JP, 1885 Meath Grand Jury Member. Married firstly 24th July 1867 Charlotte Maria (born c1834 (from the birth dates of her brothers (28.2.2)?)and died Oct 1881), eldest daughter of John Devenish-Meares, DL, JP, of Mearscourt, Co Westmeath and his wife Maria Kelly. No children. Married secondly 5th September 1882 Mary Wilhelmina Constance, (who married secondly, 16th December 1908, Lieutenant-Colonel Phineas Barrett Villiers-Tuthill, FSA, FRCSI, RAMC, youngest son of John Tuthill of Kilmore, Co Limerick), eldest daughter of Sir William Squire Barker Kaye, CD, QC, LLD, Assistant Under-Secretary for Ireland, and died 16th October 1905 leaving one son:

John George North-Bomford of Ferrans, born 13th October 1883, educated Charterhouse, served in World War I in France and Gallipoli, Major Royal Fusiliers, and in World War II with RAF. Married firstly 5th October 1909 Hilda Frances, youngest daughter of Rev George Shaw Munn, Rector of Madresfield, Malvern, Worcs. She died 31st January 1960 having had:

David John North-Bomford, born 1912, married 6th January 1946 Molly Moore (widow of Capt Clondesley Shovell Malcolm Brereton, Royal Norfolk Regt, of Briningham House, Norfolk, killed in action c1942), only daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick Thornton Trevor Moore, 4th Bengal lancers and of Crosby House, Derry. David died 28th April 1949 without children. Molly married 3rdly 4th March 1959 Hugh Keene, CIE, Indian Police, who died September 1966; 9th November 1968, as his second wife, Col Richard Crawford Langford, born 28th May 1907, RAMC in World War II, retired 1955, only son of Major Charles Langford, DSO (1901), of Royal Irish Hussars and of The Abbey, Rathkeale, Co Limerick.

Major J. G. North-Bomford married secondly 4th February 1961 Elizabeth (Betty) Susan, daughter of George Armstrong. He died 11th October 1965 and she in 1980.

Next Chapter: Chapter 29

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